Category: Testing & Monitoring

Without understanding the demands imposed on soccer players at various levels and age groups makes it very difficult to ensure coaching methods are having the correct impact on development of the player. ISSPF lecturers will yet again highlight the research in the area of modern testing & player monitoring strategies with the aim of then being able to apply the correct training stimulus & further justify coaching methodologies to maximise performance & reduce the risk of injury.

Striker in red getting past two defenders

Comparison of Motor Performance & Technical Skill Level: Post 3 Month Transition Phase

The yearly training planning in soccer involves three different training periods: preparation, competition and transition.

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Football Training

Links Between Physical Testing & Training Output: 8 Week Training Cycle on Champions League Players

The aim of the present investigation was to analyse the association between physical fitness profiles, playing positions and the profile relationships between training output amongst elite professional soccer players.

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Integrating Training Loads & Relationship to Injury Risk

Soccer can be characterised as an intermittent sport, with “repeated bouts of high-intensity running interspersed with periods of rest or low-intensity running”

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Effect Strength Training Protocols on Androgen Levels & Performance Parameters

The main androgen, testosterone, affects a variety of parameters such as body composition, muscle metabolism and function, protein synthesis, and muscle mass.18,23 These parameters are related with the ability to perform efficiently during exercise.23,35,39.

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Displacement v Energetic Variables on GPS Devices

The routine use of player-tracking devices to monitor training and competition loads has become standard practice in many elite international and professional team sports(Cummins, Orr, O’Connor, & West, 2013). Technologies such as global positioning system (GPS), local position measurement (LPM) and camera-based visual recognition systems are commonly used to assess competition demands and determine individual “work rates” (Polglaze, Dawson, & Peeling, 2016).

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